Amateur astronomy equipment, techniques, info, etc

An alternative to this mess

Moderated sci.astro.amateur has lots of the solid and once contributing
members that aren’t showing up on sci.astro.amateur any longer.  There are
more than 500 posts which include amateur astronomy videos to watch, learn
from, and enjoy.  There are polls to view and vote in and an off topic
board for those that want to read and post to that section.  The site also
includes a great arcade game room which only allows the members of the
forum to compete for best scores on more than 65 games.

Why not click on www.moderatedsciastroamateur.org and take a look around.  
You will like what you find.


Martin R. Howell
Moderated sci.astro.amateur
www.moderatedsciastroamateur.org


Posted via a free Usenet account from http://www.teranews.com

.
posted by admin in Uncategorized and have Comments (24)

24 Responses to “An alternative to this mess”

  1. admin says:

    Martin wrote:
    > Moderated sci.astro.amateur has lots of the solid and once contributing
    > members that aren’t showing up on sci.astro.amateur any longer.  There are
    > more than 500 posts which include amateur astronomy videos to watch, learn
    > from, and enjoy.  There are polls to view and vote in and an off topic
    > board for those that want to read and post to that section.  The site also
    > includes a great arcade game room which only allows the members of the
    > forum to compete for best scores on more than 65 games.

    > Why not click on http://www.moderatedsciastroamateur.org and take a look around.  
    > You will like what you find.

    Don’t you ever get tired of posting this drivel ?

    Bill

  2. admin says:

    I don’t mind you periodically posting/advertising your website, but I
    wouldn’t do it too often or you risk being seen as an abuser. Also, I don’t
    think you are doing yourself any favours by calling sci.astro.amateur "this
    mess". If this group disgusts you then you should exit, otherwise show some
    respect for your fellow subscribers. Thanks.

    Dennis

  3. admin says:

     this site takes paypal

           http://tinyurl.com/ypt5fn

    shitetard the spammertard of rosatard   buh bye tard    i want my tard

  4. admin says:

    Dennis Woos wrote:
    > I don’t mind you periodically posting/advertising your website, but I
    > wouldn’t do it too often or you risk being seen as an abuser. Also, I don’t
    > think you are doing yourself any favours by calling sci.astro.amateur "this
    > mess". If this group disgusts you then you should exit, otherwise show some
    > respect for your fellow subscribers. Thanks.

    Some of Mr. Howell’s fellow subscribers think that he’s a looong way
    from being an abuser. And we think that it’s quite a leap from "this
    mess" to "disgusted." I think that Mr. Howell’s remarks were aimed at
    the state of the group — the sporge attack, the trolls, and the nut
    cases, and I don’t see that he displayed disrespect for his fellow
    readers (not subscribers.)

    You want disrespect for fellow readers? This group is a mess in more
    ways than one. I no longer post questions here because of
    condescending, pedantic, I-know-it-all-and-I’m-never-wrong replies from
    a regular who jumps in on practically every thread, however inane, and
    who is attracted to idiotic questions like a moth to a flame. If that
    person /really/ knew it all and were not condescending that wouldn’t be
    a problem for me. I admire know-it-alls who know it all. Even on the
    Yahoo groups I check to see if that person is a member before I post a
    question. A member of one of the Yahoo astronomy groups went so far as
    to e-mail me and a few other members privately to ask if there was a
    way to ask a question on a certain subject without getting a reply from
    that person. Everyone agreed that would be good, but sadly, no one
    could think of a way short of starting a new group and barring that
    person. The "John_Doe_Need_Not_Apply_Yahoo_Astronomy_Group?" Ain’t
    gonna happen! Fortunately, one of the respondents to the private e-mail
    offered a friendly and useful answer to the question.

    Davoud


    usenet *at* davidillig dawt com

  5. admin says:

    No, it’s all your fault.

    On Wed, 23 Jan 2008 04:18:42 +0000 (UTC),
    Sender: Anonymous Sender <anonym…@remailer.metacolo.com>

  6. admin says:

    Dennis Woos wrote:
    > I don’t mind you periodically posting/advertising your website, but I
    > wouldn’t do it too often or you risk being seen as an abuser. Also, I don’t
    > think you are doing yourself any favours by calling sci.astro.amateur "this
    > mess".

    well it is a mess by any definition. a bloody mess. just shows what several
    assholes can do when they set about to destroy
    a group that is 1000% vulnerable. Its obviously an attack on any groups still
    "viable" on usenet because the sporge does not
    occur anywhere else in thousands of ng’s. With all of the computer wizards in
    this world you would think somebody could stop this, but evidently nobody cares
    enough to do it.
    The media "is" the message.

    - Hide quoted text — Show quoted text -

    > If this group disgusts you then you should exit, otherwise show some
    > respect for your fellow subscribers. Thanks.

    > Dennis

  7. admin says:

    > You want disrespect for fellow readers? This group is a mess in more
    > ways than one. I no longer post questions here because of
    > condescending, pedantic, I-know-it-all-and-I’m-never-wrong replies from
    > a regular who jumps in on practically every thread, however inane, and
    > who is attracted to idiotic questions like a moth to a flame. If that
    > person /really/ knew it all and were not condescending that wouldn’t be
    > a problem for me. …

    Wow – given your feelings I am surprised you still read/post here! I
    honestly don’t know which regular poster you are referring to. I have found
    all of the regulars to be knowledgeable folks, and over the years I have
    learned a lot. Sure, I sometimes find myself
    disappointed/annoyed/pissed-off, but this too is part of the challenge and
    satisfaction of getting along on a public forum. Furthermore, if you find
    something/someone unhelpful or anoying you can just ignore it/them. In fact,
    I have found your own Mac zealotry to be a turn-off, but have chosen not to
    get involved in the discussions. Not a big deal – I suppose many of us have
    topics that set us off – I hate to read about large exit pupils/wasted
    light, for instance.

    How about this. Let’s try and treat everyone here the way we would treat
    them if they were members of our astro club, and not allow the impersonal
    nature of newsgroup posts to negatively effect our discussions? I would
    welcome any and all of the regulars to my club, and I bet you would too.

    Dennis

  8. admin says:

    > well it is a mess by any definition. a bloody mess. just shows what
    > several
    > assholes can do when they set about to destroy
    > a group that is 1000% vulnerable. Its obviously an attack on any groups
    > still
    > "viable" on usenet because the sporge does not
    > occur anywhere else in thousands of ng’s. With all of the computer wizards
    > in
    > this world you would think somebody could stop this, but evidently nobody
    > cares
    > enough to do it.
    > The media "is" the message.

    I don’t find the sporge a big deal – I just delete it. It takes a couple of
    seconds, as the off-topic titles are pretty obvious. I just don’t get why
    some folks find it so upsetting!

    Dennis

  9. admin says:

    On Jan 22, 11:40 pm, Davoud <s…@sky.net> wrote:

    > You want disrespect for fellow readers? This group is a mess in more
    > ways than one. I no longer post questions here because of
    > condescending, pedantic, I-know-it-all-and-I’m-never-wrong replies from
    > a regular who jumps in on practically every thread, however inane, and
    > who is attracted to idiotic questions like a moth to a flame.
    > Davoud

    Yeah.  I was particularly offended one time when somebody innocently
    posted about music, and their choice of the medium on which to play it
    was questioned in a most condescending manner.

    http://tinyurl.com/yoave3

    Tom

  10. admin says:

    Martin <martinhow…@ilikestarsisp.com> wrote:
    > Moderated sci.astro.amateur has lots of the solid and once contributing

    I did my best to clean up "this mess" (and many others across usenet) by
    actually talking to the rr.com abuse folks. Once in a while, professionals
    talking to professionals actually cleans things up. I’ve seen none of the
    crap for the past two days that we had been buried by previously.

    I wouldn’t object to a moderated sci.astro.amateur, but what you’ve got
    is nothing of the sort–it’s a web forum. It requires separate
    registration, separate password management, a web browser, etc., etc..
    The joy of usenet is that I can follow my various hobbies and interests
    (coffee, fencing, astronomy, computers, security, and so on) without
    having a dozen different bookmarks for a dozen different websites, each
    with its own login and password and software.

    Web forums are a significant step backwards from the 28-year-old technology
    of usenet.

    Also, I’d be much happier if you had called it something other than
    "moderated sci.astro.amateur", which pretty clearly suggests a usenet
    group. It just ain’t one. Worse, it isn’t as good as one.

    Colin

  11. admin says:

    On Jan 23, 6:24 pm, "Colin B." <cbi…@somewhereelse.nucleus.com>
    wrote:

    - Hide quoted text — Show quoted text -

    > Martin <martinhow…@ilikestarsisp.com> wrote:
    > > Moderated sci.astro.amateur has lots of the solid and once contributing

    > I did my best to clean up "this mess" (and many others across usenet) by
    > actually talking to the rr.com abuse folks. Once in a while, professionals
    > talking to professionals actually cleans things up. I’ve seen none of the
    > crap for the past two days that we had been buried by previously.

    > I wouldn’t object to a moderated sci.astro.amateur, but what you’ve got
    > is nothing of the sort–it’s a web forum. It requires separate
    > registration, separate password management, a web browser, etc., etc..
    > The joy of usenet is that I can follow my various hobbies and interests
    > (coffee, fencing, astronomy, computers, security, and so on) without
    > having a dozen different bookmarks for a dozen different websites, each
    > with its own login and password and software.

    > Web forums are a significant step backwards from the 28-year-old technology
    > of usenet.

    > Also, I’d be much happier if you had called it something other than
    > "moderated sci.astro.amateur", which pretty clearly suggests a usenet
    > group. It just ain’t one. Worse, it isn’t as good as one.

    > Colin

    The problem is that it is little more than a magnification hobby for
    most of you,even those who are genuinely talented with photography and
    all the related fields never have the slightest intention of putting
    the images into proper context.The celestial arena is no more than
    ornaments on a celestial sphere background making it a celestial
    cistern rather than the celestial fountain notwithstanding that the
    structural/timekeeping principles  of ‘sidereal time’ observations are
    basically a cartoon made out of stars

    The great populariser of the telescope – Galileo,explicitly distates
    that it is not the instrument itself which makes an astronomer,it is
    the delight astronomers get from putting observations into proper
    context –

    SALV "But the telescope plainly shows us its horns to be as bounded
    and distinct as those of the moon, and they are seen to belong to a
    very large circle, in a ratio almost forty times as great as the same
    disc when it is beyond the sun, toward the end of its morning
    appearances.

    SAGR. 0 Nicholas Copernicus, what a pleasure it would have been for
    you to see this part of your system confirmed by so clear an
    experiment!

    SALV. Yes, but how much less would his sublime intellect be celebrated
    among the learned! For as I said before, we may see that with reason
    as his guide he resolutely continued to affirm what sensible
    experience seemed to contradict"

    http://webexhibits.org/calendars/year-text-Galileo.html

    The word ‘experiment’  looks awkward in connection with a telescope as
    Galileo uses the term but I know what he means.The images from Uranus
    likewise demonstrate  how telescopes act as a tool for structural and
    timekeeping astronomy,the reason for the unequal noon cycles is
    confirmed by experiment and observation,at least in terms that
    Galilkeo would have understood.

    There is always room for magnification as a hobby but unfortunately
    that is all the world recognises as astronomy,the great astronomical
    insights are still to be made and found by those who return to the
    geometric roots of the king of all disciplines in matters of
    terrestrial/celestial phenomena,not this middle class optical
    indulgence tethered to a anti-intutive ‘scientific method’.

  12. admin says:

    the good Doctor, withdrew to speak to another group, and we
    entered into a short conversation with the white-headed old man to
    whom we had been introduced. He was profuse in his expressions of
    sympathy for our purity work, but somehow, we could hardly have
    defined why, we were not interested in him, and soon turned away.
    The occasion that gave the opportunity for his introduction, was a
    missionary conference at Singapore. The man in question had explained
    to us that he was not of the same denomination as the church that had
    called together the reception of that evening, but that he seldom
    failed to attend all such gatherings, no matter of what denomination,
    because of his interest in every part of the "Father’s Kingdom".

    Although we were very weary, and the air was intensely close,
    Singapore being only about seventy-five miles from the Equator, we
    spent most of that night and of several others in company with a
    Christian friend and interpreter, in the worst parts of the city; and
    this, with visits to various regions during the day, gave us a pretty
    clear understanding of the situation as to the matter of enforcement
    or non-enforcement of the Protective Ordinance.

        "On the night of February 1st, 1894, we went to Tringanu street,
        and ascended to the third story of a large building. The front
        windows of this upper floor were gaily lighted up by many colored
        lamps, and could be seen far down the street. There was a small
        opium den at the foot of the stairway, on the ground floor. On
        reaching the head of the stairs, and turning, we entered a large
        front room. There were bedrooms at the back of the house, to be
        let to patrons of the establishment. At the opposite end of the
        front room from the windows was the ever-present idolatrous
        shrine. On either side of t

  13. admin says:

    her sentence was remitted, and she was
        fined twenty-five dollars. No record is made as to what became of
        these hapless girls; it is to be assumed that they were sent back
        to the brothel.

        2. Two girls brought before the Registrar General, both of whom
        pleaded for protection against their owner, stating that she
        intended to sell them to go to California. One of these had been
        bought by this woman for eighty dollars; the girl saw the price
        paid for her; the other said her mother was very poor, and sold
        her for twenty dollars. Each declared she had been living under
        the "protection" of a foreigner until recently, and that she had
        not "acted as a prostitute"; they now feared being "sold into
        California" by the woman in charge. The Inspector said: "There has
        been at times a number of women residing in the house, and I do
        not know what has become of them. I believe that they have been
        sent to California by the defendant." One of the girls being
        recalled, and seeming to have g

  14. admin says:

    one to attempt that which seems
    beyond our powers and opportunity,–some one who will feel the call of
    God; who has the training and the ability; some one who has the spirit
    of devotion and self-denial; some one of keen moral perceptions and
    lofty faith in the ultimate triumph of justice, who will lead a
    crusade that will never halt until Oriental slavery is banished from
    our land, and it can no more be said, "The name of God is blasphemed
    among the heathen because of you."

    The documents from which we have quoted so extensively in this book
    are the following:

    "_Correspondence Relating to the Working of the Contagious Diseases
    Ordinances of the Colony of Hongkong_." August 1881. C.-3093.

    "_Copy of Report of the Commissioners Appointed by His Excellency,
    John Pope Hennessy … to inquire Into the Working of the Contagious
    Diseases Ordinance, 1867_." March 11, 1880. H.C. 118.

    "_Correspondence Respecting the Alleged Existence of Chinese Slavery
    in Hongkong_." March, 1882. C.-3185.

    "_Return of all the British Colonies and Dependencies in Which by
    Ordinance or Otherwise Any System Involving the Principles of the Late
    Contagious Diseases Acts, 1866 and 1869, is in force, with Copies of
    Such Ordinances or Other Regulations_." June, 1886. H.C. 247.

    "_Copies of Correspondence or Extracts Therefrom Relating to the
    Repeal of Contagious Diseases Ordinances and Regulations in the Crown
    Colonies_." September, 1887. H.C. 347

    Same as above, in continuation, March, 1889. H.C. 59.

    Same as above, in continuation, June, 1890. H.C. 242.

    "_Copy of Correspondence which has taken place since that comprised
    in the Paper presente

  15. admin says:

    Brothel Ordinance, conferring _necessarily_ almost despotic
    powers on the Registrar General." … Be it said to the honor of
    Attorney General (now Sir Julian) Pauncefote, that in the face of this
    he urges the most weighty objections to the policy of "subjecting
    persons to fine and imprisonment without the safeguards which surround
    the administration of justice in a public and open court." But these
    objections were not allowed to prevail.

    It appears that some hesitation was felt on the part of the home
    authorities in giving approval to the new ordinance. It may have been
    the warning given by Attorney General Pauncefote, it may have been
    something else. Whatever it was, the Commission informs us: "The
    Ordinance 10 of 1867 received its final sanction when the conclusion
    arrived at by the Colonial Government was before the home authorities,
    showing that in the event of the ordinance becoming law, _revenue
    would be derived_ from the tainted source of prostitution among the
    Chinese." (The italics are the authors’).

    Ordinance 10, 1867 now came into operation, with the following
    additional powers in the hands of the "Protector" of Chinese, the
    Registrar General:

        1st, Not only were keepers of unregistered houses to be fined or
        sent to prison, but the women–"held in practical slavery for the
        purposes of prostitution"–when found in unregistered houses were
        also subject to fine and imprisonment.

        2nd, The Registrar-General, otherwise the "Protector" of Chinese,
        could break into any house suspected of being a brothel, and
        arrest the keeper thereof without warrant. And he could authorize
        his underlings to do the same.

        3rd, The Registrar General could exercise both judicial and
        executive powers in the prosecution of the duties of his office.

        4th, All outdoor prostitutes could be arrested without warrant,
        fined and imprisoned.

        The new law possessed one virtue over the old. It frankly, and

  16. admin says:

    We asked
    who came with the Chinese girls when they came to the Protectorate.
    He answered, "Oh, a friend–the woman or ‘mother’ who owns them." We
    asked if nothing could be done against these traffickers in girls; he
    said they could not often get sufficient proof against them. We saw in
    one of the records something about "women traffickers," and pressed
    him to know why these could not be caught and banished by means of
    paid detectives watching the incoming boats. He replied that it was
    very hard to get evidence; the girls’ own statements were not enough;
    the Protectorate needed more power. When asked what powers were
    further necessary, he suggested the power to punish the traffickers
    of girls by simply the statement of the girls who were brought to
    Singapore through fraud, or who were kidnaped. He then spoke of a drug
    which was used by the women traffickers to destroy the girls’ wits; he
    believed in its existence and its use. He said of these cases of fraud
    and kidnaping, "We can usually do nothing." We asked if a woman was
    found bringing girls over and over again whether she could not be
    prosecuted: he answered that she might be. We then asked if the
    Protectorate had ever prosecuted: he replied, "Oh yes, a few times."
    But he grew uneasy under these questions; said no one could know or
    apprecia

  17. admin says:

    closely resembling that which has for
        many years been working in Canada, and more in accord with the
        dictates of ordinary humanity and English ideas of the liberty of
        the subject.

        Among the Chinese at Singapore the women number less than
        one-fifth of the population, and at Penang the proportion between
        males and females is practically the same. In the immigration
        returns the disparity is even more marked, for there is only
        one female immigrant to every eighteen men. This extraordinary
        preponderance of males in the Chinese population of these towns
        has given rise to, and is made the standing excuse for, a
        wholesale system of prostitution to which it would be difficult
        to find a parallel. Government registration and protection have
        favored the growth of this diabolical plague spot, for, strange to
        say, this gigantic system of debauchery is under the direction
        of the department which is euphemistically entitled "The Chinese
        Protectorate," the "Protector of Chinese" at Singapore being also
        the Inspector of over 200

  18. admin says:

    Kimberley, Secretary of State. Said he:

        "I had hoped that these letters would have been forwarded
        last year, in the belief that they might have induced a less
        unfavorable view by Lord Kimberley of my judicial action as to
        these matters, and with the more important object of presenting
        what appears to me to be the great gravity of the evils I have
        denounced, as they affect the moral status of the Colony, in order
        that some remedy may be applied to them…. I am informed that His
        Excellency the Governor has been unable to obtain the opinion of
        the Attorney-General on the points raised." …

    It is impossible not to feel that this neglect on the part of someone
    at Hong Kong to forward the Chief Justice’s letters until the first of
    these was a year old (for they were actually sent in August, 1881),
    was a designed obstruction of his endeavors to set himself in the
    correct light, and to enlighten the Christian public of Great Britain
    as to the abuses existing at Hong Kong.

    In this letter expressing regret at the delay of his letters, he
    speaks of convictions of eight more cases of kidnaping, and "almost
    unprecedented brutal assaults on bought children." "Considering the
    special waste of life in brothel life, and the general want of new
    importations to keep up the bondage class of 20,000 in this Colony,
    the cases of kidnaping detected cannot be one-half of one per cent of
    the children and women kidnaped."

        "Two cases of brutal treatment of young girls by purchasers, their
        pocket-mothers, one little girl having had her leg broken by
        b

  19. admin says:

    to kidnaping and domestic
    slavery. His reply is dated August 26th, and in it he refers to
    reasons for his delay in replying, of which the Governor is "well
    aware." His supplementary letter enclosing the Memorandum of slavery
    by Mr. Francis, was dated Nov. 24th, 1880. On April 2nd, 1881, he
    wrote a third time to the Colonial Secretary, from which we gather
    that even up to that time his explanations had not been forwarded to
    Lord Kimberley, Secretary of State. Said he:

        "I had hoped that these letters would have been forwarded
        last year, in the belief that they might have induced a less
        unfavorable view by Lord Kimberley of my judicial action as to
        these matters, and with the more important object of presenting
        what appears to me to be the great gravity of the evils I have
        denounced, as they affect the moral status of the Colony, in order
        that some remedy may be applied to them…. I am informed that His
        Excellency the Governor has been unable to obtain the opinion of
        the Attorney-General on the points raised." …

    It is impossible not to feel that this neglect on the part of someone
    at Hong Kong to forward the Chief Justice’s letters until the first of
    these was a year old (for they were actually sent in August, 1881),
    was a designed obstruction of his endeavors to set himself in the
    correct light, and to enlighten the Christian public of Great Britain
    as to the abuses existing at Hong Kong.

    In this letter expressing regret at the delay of his letters, he
    speaks of convictions of eight more cases of kidnaping, and "almost
    unprecedented brutal assaults on bought children." "Considering the
    special waste of life in brothel life, and the general want of new
    importations to keep up the bondage class of 20,000 in this Co

  20. admin says:

    sanctioned the appropriation of Government
        money for the pay of informers who might induce Chinese women to
        prostitute themselves, and thus bring them under the penal clauses
        of the Contagious Diseases Ordinance. For many years past this
        branch of the Registrar General’s office has led to grave abuses.
        It has been a fruitful source of extortion, but what is far worse,
        a department of the State, as one of the local papers now points
        out, which is supposed to be constituted for the protection of the
        Chinese, has been employing a dangerously loose system, whereby
        the sanctity of native households may be seriously compromised.
        I had no idea that the Secret Service Fund was used for this
        loathsome purpose until my attention was drawn to an inquest on
        the bodies of two Chinese women who were killed by falling from
        a house in which one of the informers employed by the Registrar
        General was pursuing his avocations…. I am taking steps to
        institute a searching inquiry into the whole subject. The European
        community are ashamed at the revelations that have been made at
        the inquest, and amongst the Chinese the practice that has been
        brought to light is, viewed with abhorrence."

    This was the incident which led to the appointment of the Commission
    of Inquiry into the working of the Contagious Diseases Ordinance, the
    report of which Commission we have already had occasion to quote from
    more than once.

    Later, Governor Hennessy wrote to the Colonial Office:

        "Whilst the Attorney General is of opinion that, strictly
        speaking, there is a _prima facie_ case of manslaughter made out
        against Inspector Lee, and that possibly a conviction might be
        obtained, he advises against a prosecution. I do not c

  21. admin says:

    return, there was quite a
        flutter of excitement, and we instantly saw that there was
        a number of girls present, all very young, and several mere
        children. On our left a fat, middle-aged Chinese man sat, with two
        or three little girls, one in his lap and one on either side of
        him, in his arms; two more were throwing something that resembled
        dice on a table within the front alcove, and the rest were sitting
        on the opium couches. There were ten girls in all; the two
        youngest could not possibly have been more than eight years old;
        only one, out of the ten, claimed to be over sixteen; we
        all doubted her claim, because of her extreme immaturity of
        appearance. The two youngest children were immediately sent away
        by order of the fat man, who was evidently in authority. The men
        explained that these girls belonged to different women who were
        not their own mothers; that they came to sing and dance, and pour
        wine for the patrons who came to the place. They also explained
        that all these girls were brought from the brothels, and were
        either already living a bad life or were being trained up for
        prostitution. They were powdered heavily, had flowers and
        ornaments in their hair, the upper part of the forehead made bare,
        and the hair dressed elaborately, like married women (even the
        very youngest children); of course they were not married, for they
        were declared to be the property of the brothel-keepers, and this
        manner of dress must, therefore, have been an advertisement of
        their shame.

        "A curious musical instrument was brought–somewhat like a
        dulcimer–on which two of the girls played in succession, singing
        in a high, monotonous way.

        "From here we went to the first plac

  22. admin says:

    that on no account could she tell a human being how the
    intelligence was conveyed to her, as it might cost others very dearly,
    even to the sacrifice of life, if the knowledge leaked out. "But," she
    said, "I will show you the girl and you may talk with her yourselves."
    We gathered from the girl that she was a respectable widow, the mother
    of two children, living with her parents not far from Hong Kong on the
    mainland. As they were very poor, she went to Hong Kong to work at
    sewing to help support the family. An acquaintance there told her
    that she could earn as much as thirty dollars a month at sewing in
    California, and he could secure her passage for her at economical
    cost. She returned to her home and consulted her parents, and they
    thought the chance a good one, so bidding her little ones good bye,
    she returned to Hong Kong and paid for the ticket, being instructed
    that a certain woman would meet her at the wharf at San Francisco whom
    she must claim as her "mother," since the immigration laws were so
    strict that she must pass herself off as the daughter of this woman
    (for this daughter, who was now in China, having lived in the United
    States was entitled to return to her mother). Reader, have you ever
    traveled on another’s ticket? If so, or if you have known a professing

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    that promised much good for the future had his
    course of action been continued. This official planted his feet
    squarely upon the doctrine that all buying and selling of human beings
    was slavery, and that a human being cannot, in law, "become a slave,
    even by his own consent." And moreover this official, with Governor
    Hennessey’s encouragement, prosecuted his cases without any tender
    consideration as to the demands of European libertines, who would be
    left with scant opportunities to be self-indulgent unless slaves were
    placed at their disposal. The truth is, from the foreign standpoint,
    the plea for brothel slavery was based upon the "necessity" of vice,
    and from the Chinese standpoint the plea for slavery was based upon
    so-called Chinese "custom." The Government was impressed that it must
    have consideration for the demands of libertines, and consideration
    for Chinese "custom." Neither of these arguments has any worth when
    applied to the slave conditions of California, and therefore the most
    serious, baffling obstacles to a removal of the evil are out of the
    way. Both pretexts, we maintain, were false. There is no necessity for
    furnishing vice to libertines; there was no lawful Chinese custom to
    be opposed in opposing brothel slavery. But even if these were claimed
    to be sufficient arguments across the water, they have no force in
    California. There are women, alas! willing to make a trade of their
    virtue for _their own gain_, without forcing Chinese wo

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    Tanka women, and especially under the protection of these ‘protected’
    Tanka women, that private prostitution and the sale of girls for
    concubinage flourishes, being looked upon as a legitimate profession.
    Consequently, almost every ‘protected woman’ keeps a nursery of
    purchased children or a few servant girls who are being reared with
    a view to their eventual disposal, according to their personal
    qualifications, either among foreigners here as kept women, or among
    Chinese residents as their concubines, or to be sold for export to
    Singapore, San Francisco, or Australia. Those ‘protected women,’
    moreover, generally act as ‘protectors’ each to a few other Tanka
    women who live by sly prostitution."

    When once a man enters the service of Satan he is generally pressed
    along into it to lengths he did not at first intend to go. So it
    proved in the case of many foreigners at Hong Kong. The foreigner
    extended his "protection" to a native mistress. That "protected woman"
    extended his name as "protector" over the inmates of her secret
    brothel; and into that house protected largely from official
    interference, purchased and kidnaped girls were introduced and reared
    for the trade in women. The sensitive point seems to have been that
    an enforcement of the anti-slavery laws would have interfered in many
    instances with the illicit relations of the foreigner, exposing him
    to ignominy and sending the mother of his children to prison. It was
    sufficient for the "protected" woman to say, when the officer of the
    law rapped at her door, "This is not a brothel, but the private
    family residence of Mr. So-and-So," naming some foreigner,–perhaps
    a high-placed official,–and the officer’s search would proceed no
    further.

    It was claimed that this slavery, and also domestic slavery, which
    sprang up so suddenly after the settlement of Hong Kong by the
    British, was the outgrowth of Chinese customs, and could not be
    suppressed but with the greatest difficulty, and their suppression
    was an unwarrantable interfe

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